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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 95-98

Where are we in cosmetics and esthetics practices in educational clinics in Turkey?


1 Department of Dermatology, University of Health Sciences, Şişli Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
2 Doku Medical Centre, Medeniyet University, Göztepe Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
3 Department of Dermatology, Medeniyet University, Göztepe Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Ezgi Ozkur
Department of Dermatology, University of Health Sciences, Şişli Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul
Turkey
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/TJD.TJD_6_19

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Objective: Cosmetic dermatology has recently gained importance with the recent increase in demand. The aim of this study is to identify cosmetic dermatology training in Turkey and to assess instructors' attitudes toward cosmetic dermatology training during residency and current cosmetic dermatology practices. Methods: This is a cross-sectional questionnaire study conducted with instructors to investigate the practice of cosmetics dermatology, the technical equipments, number of patients, and their ideas in the clinics that provide dermatology specialty education in Turkey. Results: At least one cosmetic procedure was found to be performed in 69% of the clinics that participated in the study (n = 55), and no cosmetic procedure was performed in 31% of the clinics. The mean number of application was 13.2 ± 12.3 weekly in the clinics that performed cosmetics procedure. The most common procedures were botulinum toxin injection with 63.6% (n = 35), chemical peeling with 60% (n = 33), and platelet-rich plasma with 60% (n = 33), respectively. The most common laser application was neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (28/55). The mean time spent for cosmetic procedures was 1–5 h weekly in the clinics which performed cosmetic procedures. Seventy-six percent (n = 42) of the participants felt inadequate for performing cosmetics procedures, and 95% (n = 52) reported that cosmetic dermatology education was required. Conclusions: Both theoretical and practical education must be given in educational clinics, and the infrastructure must be created, and the educational schedule must be standardized.


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